Metamorphoses - Denis Feeney, Ovid, David Raeburn

Now that I have whittled down my currently reading shelf, I will start on my main reading project for this spring: Ovid’s Metamorphoses.

I dimly remember translating parts of this in Latin class in high school, but I can’t say I truly appreciated Ovid’s work other than for the sense of achievement that comes with slowly being able to translate a text from another language.

It is time for a re-read.

I have no doubt that I will have lots of thoughts on this book. In fact, I believe this is the book that once already (when I first read parts of it) shattered my believe that people thought the world was flat until the age of the great explorers, when in fact, this notion of the flat earth had already been argued against, and a spherical shape widely accepted, by the Ancient Greeks. But such is the power of reading classical texts, isn’t it?

It’s not just a journey back in time to discover old stories, it’s also a journey through the history of what is accepted as scientific knowledge.

Anyway, I will keep this as the main post and add updates of the 15 Books of the Metamorphoses as I sail through them.

(Image: an imaginary likeness of Ovid, statue standing in his birthplace, Sulmona, Italy. Photo: Bill Jennings.)